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Electron microscopes

The CCI offers access to two different types of electron microscopes. Here is a brief overview of the different techniques:

Scanning electron microscope

 See Carl Zeiss Gemini

Figure: SEM image of a lung tissue from pig.

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with atoms in the sample, producing various signals that contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. SEM can achieve resolution better than 1 nanometer. Specimens can be observed in high vacuum, in low vacuum, in wet conditions (in environmental SEM), and at a wide range of cryogenic or elevated temperatures.
The most common SEM mode is detection of secondary electrons emitted by atoms excited by the electron beam. The number of secondary electrons that can be detected depends, among other things, on the angle at which beam meets surface of specimen. By scanning the sample and collecting the secondary electrons that are emitted using a special detector, an image displaying the topography of the surface is created.
 

Transmission electron microscope

See LEO 912 OMEGA

Figure: TEM image of Ileum goblet cells from mouse (courtesy Anna Ermund)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a microscopy technique in which a beam of electrons is transmitted through an ultra-thin specimen, interacting with the specimen as it passes through it. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons transmitted through the specimen; the image is magnified and focused onto an imaging device, such as a fluorescent screen to be detected by a CCD camera.
TEMs are capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes, owing to the small de Broglie wavelength of electrons. This enables the instrument's user to examine fine detail - even as small as a single column of atoms, which is thousands of times smaller than the smallest resolvable object in a light microscope. TEM forms a major analysis method in a range of scientific fields, in physical, chemical and biological sciences. TEMs find application in cancer research, virology, material sciences as well as pollution, nanotechnology, and semiconductor research.
At smaller magnifications TEM image contrast is due to absorption of electrons in the material, due to the thickness and composition of the material. At higher magnifications complex wave interactions modulate the intensity of the image, requiring expert analysis of observed images. Alternate modes of use allow for the TEM to observe modulations in chemical identity, crystal orientation, electronic structure and sample induced electron phase shift as well as the regular absorption based imaging.
 

 

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Page Manager: CCI web manager|Last update: 10/10/2016
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